A Small Building with a Big History

This is where Kohl, Wehner and Strauß enjoyed their frankfurters and wieners; it is where Genscher, Blüm, Töpfer, Fischer and other politically prominent figures bought their sandwiches and gummi bears: the sidewalk kiosk at the Bundeshaus in Bonn, the so-called Bundesbüdchen. Measuring only 20 square meters and slightly more than 60 years old, It is one of the more unusual structures on the list of German monuments. The family of Jürgen Rausch built the kiosk. And the Friends of the Historic Kiosk now want to bring the original back to life again in sight of its former location.

The Beginnings

Constructed in 1957 as a small kidney-shaped pavilion - Bonn's cult kiosk was not always quite so modern: Jürgen Rausch's mother began selling out of a wheelbarrow in Bonn's government district, then from a post-war shed, followed by a mobile concession trailer, and finally from the Bundesbüdchen. A stylish statement of the 1950s, the oval kiosk sat on a tiled base. Its roof was a broad, overhanging canopy that sheltered customers from rain and sun. The sales area was enclosed in glass. The "Bundesbüdchen" - a treasure in Bonn's former government district. It stood diagonally across from the entrance to the Bundesrat, not far from the main entrance to the Bundestag on the one side, and the driveway to the Chancellor's Office on the other side - along the path of everyone and anyone who had reason to be part of the Bonn Republic's very modest power center . . .
The Bundesbüdchen has enjoyed "cult status" since the days of Konrad Adenauer: Konrad Adenauer purchased his daily newspaper here, Herbert Wehner was a regular customer, Helmut Kohl had his chauffeur buy him sandwiches here. Wolfgang Clement often stopped at the kiosk for a coffee. Joschka Fischer bought his comics at the stand. And Gerhard Schröder rattled the fence of the Chancellor's Office within a stone's throw of the Bundesbüdchen.
Jürgen Rausch was well acquainted with Germany's top-level politicians. Day in and day out they stood at the kiosk. His pavilion attained national notoriety through Friedrich Nowottny. In 1981 the WDR newsman lost a wager in the TV show "You want to bet?" and as his "penalty" sold frankfurters at the kiosk. The Bundesbüdchen was also the setting for political broadcasts, movies, comedies, and entertainment shows. Although measuring only 20 square meters the Bundesbüdchen was regarded as a symbol of the Federal Republic governed from Bonn - for almost 50 years.
"At no other government district in the world is there such an unpretentious place for spontaneous, agenda-free communication."  Former Minister of Labor Norbert Blüm They all came together here: leading politicians, backbenchers, journalists, Bundestag attendants and messengers, a classless gathering of frankfurter lovers and coffee drinkers: the ultimate information bourse. Upon the government's move to Berlin in 1999 the Bundesbüdchen and its owner, Jürgen Rausch, lost its prominent customers and only a few years later even its location. The kiosk stood in the way of the WCCB, the World Conference Center Bonn, in 2006. Fortunately, however, the monument preservation authorities prevented the original kiosk from being demolished. It was transported intact and stored on the premises of a moving company. As an interim solution Jürgen Rausch now operates a snack bar constructed of untrimmed planks next to the parking garage behind the WCCB, all the while making every effort to have the original Bundesbüdchen reassembled. After 14 years in storage, the Kiosk is now set for a comeback.
new place Bundesbüdchen (in front of Heussallee 11)
Germany's WDR television station reported on the Bundesbüdchen in its Lokalzeit ("Local Time") program in 2016.
picture: LVR-Redaktion KuLaDig, Köln
pictures: Jürgen Rausch, privat
Foto: Jürgen Schulz
picture: Jürgen Schulz

A Small Building with a Big

History

This is where Kohl, Wehner and Strauß enjoyed their frankfurters and wieners; it is where Genscher, Blüm, Töpfer, Fischer and other politically prominent figures bought their sandwiches and gummi bears: the sidewalk kiosk at the Bundeshaus in Bonn, the so-called Bundesbüdchen. Measuring only 20 square meters and slightly more than 60 years old, It is one of the more unusual structures on the list of German monuments. The family of Jürgen Rausch built the kiosk. And the Friends of the Historic Kiosk now want to bring the original back to life again in sight of its former location.

The Beginnings

Constructed in 1957 as a small kidney- shaped pavilion - Bonn's cult kiosk was not always quite so modern: Jürgen Rausch's mother began selling out of a wheelbarrow in Bonn's government district, then from a post-war shed, followed by a mobile concession trailer, and finally from the Bundesbüdchen. A stylish statement of the 1950s, the oval kiosk sat on a tiled base. Its roof was a broad, overhanging canopy that sheltered customers from rain and sun. The sales area was enclosed in glass. The "Bundesbüdchen" - a treasure in Bonn's former government district. It stood diagonally across from the entrance to the Bundesrat, not far from the main entrance to the Bundestag on the one side, and the driveway to the Chancellor's Office on the other side - along the path of everyone and anyone who had reason to be part of the Bonn Republic's very modest power center . . .
The Bundesbüdchen has enjoyed "cult status" since the days of Konrad Adenauer: Konrad Adenauer purchased his daily newspaper here, Herbert Wehner was a regular customer, Helmut Kohl had his chauffeur buy him sandwiches here. Wolfgang Clement often stopped at the kiosk for a coffee. Joschka Fischer bought his comics at the stand. And Gerhard Schröder rattled the fence of the Chancellor's Office within a stone's throw of the Bundesbüdchen.
"At no other government district in the world is there such an unpretentious place for spontaneous, agenda-free communication."  Former Minister of Labor Norbert Blüm
Jürgen Rausch was well acquainted with Germany's top-level politicians. Day in and day out they stood at the kiosk. His pavilion attained national notoriety through Friedrich Nowottny. In 1981 the WDR newsman lost a wager in the TV show "You want to bet?" and as his "penalty" sold frankfurters at the kiosk. The Bundesbüdchen was also the setting for political broadcasts, movies, comedies, and entertainment shows. Although measuring only 20 square meters the Bundesbüdchen was regarded as a symbol of the Federal Republic governed from Bonn - for almost 50 years.
They all came together here: leading politicians, backbenchers, journalists, Bundestag attendants and messengers, a classless gathering of frankfurter lovers and coffee drinkers: the ultimate information bourse.
Upon    the    government's    move    to    Berlin    in 1999    the    Bundesbüdchen    and    its    owner, Jürgen   Rausch,   lost   its   prominent   customers and   only   a   few   years   later   even   its   location. The   kiosk   stood   in   the   way   of   the   WCCB,   the World    Conference    Center    Bonn,    in    2006. Fortunately,        however,        the        monument preservation       authorities       prevented       the original   kiosk   from   being   demolished.   It   was transported      intact      and      stored      on      the premises   of   a   moving   company.   As   an   interim solution   Jürgen   Rausch   now   operates   a   snack bar   constructed   of   untrimmed   planks   next   to the   parking   garage   behind   the   WCCB,   all   the while   making   every   effort   to   have   the   original Bundesbüdchen reassembled.
After 14 years in storage, the Kiosk is now set for a comeback.
Germany's WDR television station reported on the Bundesbüdchen in its Lokalzeit ("Local Time") program in 2016.
new Place Bundesbüdchen (in front of Heussallee 11)
picture: LVR-Redaktion KuLaDig, Köln
picture: Jürgen Schulz
Förderverein historischer Verkaufspavillon e.V.
Förderverein historischer Verkaufspavillon e.V.
BUNDESBÜDCHEN Förderverein historischer Verkaufspavillon e.V.